Sex Health Blog

Exploring Body Image, Eating Disorders, and Sexual Dysfunction

Past research has indicated that eating disorders and sexual disorders are more prevalent in women than in men. Moreover, eating disorders and sexual disorders have been shown to co-occur in individuals, meaning that a person can have both conditions at the same time. (When two or more medical conditions occur in an individual at the same time, they are known as comorbid conditions).

Exploring Body Image, Eating Disorders, and Sexual Dysfunction

How Sex Changes With Age

Those who believe that sex ceases to play a significant role in people’s lives as they age may want to reconsider their opinion. A 2017 national survey of senior citizens conducted at the University of Michigan revealed that 40% of men and women between the ages of 65 to 80 are still having sex. For those who were in relationships, this rate rose to 54%. Sixty-one percent of the survey participants indicated that sex is still an important factor in their quality of life.

Stock photo. Posed by model.

Are Sexual Dysfunction and Urinary Symptoms Related?

Erectile dysfunction (ED) and female sexual dysfunction (FSD) are complex conditions that negatively impact one’s ability to experience satisfying, consensual sexual activity. A person’s sexual function can be influenced by physical and psychological factors, so ED/FSD often occur at the same time as other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and depression.

Are Sexual Dysfunction and Urinary Symptoms Related?

The Gynogram: Paving the Way for Better Postmenopausal Sex?

A woman’s body undergoes several major changes over the course of her lifetime, many of which can have an impact on her sexual health and overall wellbeing. For example, when a woman enters menopause, her estrogen levels and those of her other steroid hormones decrease. This can lead to changes in her vulvar and vaginal tissues that can result in vaginal dryness, less vaginal elasticity, and burning or pain during sexual intercourse – a condition known as vulvo-vaginal atrophy (VVA)/genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM).

The Gynogram: Paving the Way for Better Postmenopausal Sex?

What Is Interstitial Cystitis?

Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a chronic condition that causes pain, pressure, and/or discomfort in the bladder. Although IC is not caused by an infection, its symptoms may feel like a bladder infection. To be considered IC, symptoms must persist for at least six weeks. Sometimes, when a person is experiencing bladder pain but there are no visible abnormalities in the organ, the condition is referred to as painful bladder syndrome (PBS). Together, IC and PBS are classified under the umbrella term: bladder pain syndrome (BPS).

What Is Interstitial Cystitis?

The Role of the Mind in Erections and Erectile Dysfunction

The SMSNA periodically receives and publishes guest editorials by sexual medicine specialists.  The current article was submitted by Mark Goldberg, LCMFT, CST, a certified sex therapist and SMSNA member who specializes in sexual medicine in Maryland and hosts the Erectile Dysfunction Radio Podcast.  The content has been reviewed by the SMSNA Website Committee for accuracy. 

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a complex medical condition which includes both physical and mental components. The paradigm of what causes ED and how it is treated has shifted over the past 50 years from a mental focus to a physical one.

The Role of the Mind in Erections and Erectile Dysfunction

Advice for Choosing a Qualified Gender-Affirming Provider

There are several factors to consider when it comes to finding a provider who is knowledgeable about transgender health care needs and who can support transgender patients by providing high-quality gender-affirming care, primary care, or other specialty care. Dr. Maurice Garcia, transgender surgeon and director of the Cedars-Sinai Transgender Surgery and Health Program, and Dr. Sheryl Kingsberg, psychologist and chief of the division of behavioral medicine at MacDonald Women's Hospital/University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, shared advice for transgender patients on this topic.

Advice for Choosing a Qualified Gender-Affirming Provider

Medicaid Coverage of Transgender Transition-Related Health Care by State

As anyone who has ever tried to navigate health care coverage can attest, it is all too often a frustrating, fruitless endeavor characterized by multiple phone calls, numerous transfers, and invariably long hold times. This cumbersome process creates an obstacle for those seeking medical treatment and may disproportionately affect transgender individuals seeking treatment for gender dysphoria.

Medicaid Coverage of Transgender Transition-Related Health Care by State

Rare Disorders of Painful Nocturnal Erection

For individuals suffering from a condition that affects their sexual function, receiving an accurate diagnosis is an important first step in the process of pursuing treatment. This may seem simple, but unfortunately, many sexual disorders have overlapping symptoms and manifest themselves in similar ways, sometimes making it difficult to identify the root of the problem. Stuttering priapism (SP) and sleep-related painful erection (SRPE) are two rare disorders that have similar symptoms and can cause painful erections at night, but they are distinct conditions that should be managed and treated in different ways.

Rare Disorders of Painful Nocturnal Erection

An Overview of Hard Flaccid Syndrome

Hard flaccid syndrome (HF) is a sexual disorder that has not yet been formally recognized and defined by the sexual medicine community. Nevertheless, internet forums, chat groups, and social media groups have formed to support patients who suffer from the symptoms of this disorder, indicating that it is a relevant condition that affects one’s health and sexual function.

An Overview of Hard Flaccid Syndrome

An Overview of Concealed Penis

Concealed penis (also known as buried or hidden penis) is a condition in which the penis is partially or fully covered by the skin of the abdomen, thighs, or scrotum and does not fully protrude from the body. Unlike micropenis, a concealed penis is typically average in length but hidden under skin. It is an uncommon condition that can be congenital (present at birth) or acquired later in life.

An Overview of Concealed Penis

A Versatile Sex Life May Increase Sexual Satisfaction for Women With Endometriosis

For women who suffer from chronic pelvic pain due to endometriosis, non-coital sexual activities such as petting and oral sex may provide an effective alternative to penile-vaginal sex for reaching orgasm and achieving a more satisfying sex life. In a recent study that surveyed 868 women from Switzerland, Germany, and Austria (434 women with endometriosis and 434 women who were part of a control group), researchers found that although the women with endometriosis were less likely than those in the control group to reach orgasm during sexual intercourse, there was no significant difference in orgasm rates during masturbation and non-coital partnered activities between the two groups of women.

A Versatile Sex Life May Increase Sexual Satisfaction for Women With Endometriosis

Most Men Like Their Penile Implants

Mention a penile implant to a man with erectile dysfunction (ED), and you might get a squeamish look. The idea of having surgery on his private parts is likely to make any man squirm. And, naturally, there are questions. Will the implant work? Will there be complications? Will sex feel the same? What do partners think?

Most Men Like Their Penile Implants

Unpacking the Latest Testosterone Therapy Guidelines

The American Urological Association (AUA) is a professional organization for urologists. Founded in 1902, the organization now has over 21,000 members. One of its many roles is to provide guidelines on various aspects of urologic health so that doctors can best serve their patients.

Unpacking the Latest Testosterone Therapy Guidelines

Coping with Mismatched Sex Drives

You and your partner probably have a lot in common. Or if you’re not partnered, you likely seek common traits in a prospective mate. Whether it’s a love of baseball, camping, or rock concerts, these commonalities help keep you close as a couple.

Coping with Mismatched Sex Drives

Do Orgasms Change Over Time?

Like many aspects of sex, orgasms are always changing. You might have one night of passion that feels like an out-of-body experience. You might have another that is pleasant, but not necessarily powerful. And you might have another that is just humdrum. Should you worry?

Do Orgasms Change Over Time?

Communication, Sexual Self-Esteem Important for Women’s Orgasms

Back in December, we started covering an interesting Finnish study about women’s orgasms. A team of researchers compiled the results of five different sex surveys taken over four decades starting in the early 1970s. Over 10,000 men and women participated, and the researchers focused on women’s orgasms. They published their findings in October 2016 in the journal Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology.

Communication, Sexual Self-Esteem Important for Women’s Orgasms

The Effects of Cancer on Women’s Sexuality

In August 2017, the European Journal of Cancer Care published a comprehensive review by Canadian researchers that involved over 100 medical studies concerning women, cancer, and sexual health. The authors delved into the physical and psychological aspects of cancer that can affect sexuality. They also discussed some of the ways patients and their healthcare team might approach sexual problems during and after cancer treatment.

The Effects of Cancer on Women’s Sexuality

After Orgasm: A Range of Reactions

Orgasm is sometimes described as an out-of-the-body experience. We’d add that it’s a full-body experience, too. Think about the body parts involved: Your eyes see your partner’s smile; your skin receives touch. Your brain sends signals through your nervous system, telling your genitals to start getting ready for the main event. Your blood pumps harder. Your breathing quickens. And then, if things go as planned, you and your partner climax – sometimes together, but more often separately.

After Orgasm: A Range of Reactions

Sex and Anxiety

Here on SexHealthMatters we often talk about the role of the brain during sexual activity. While the genitals may seem more involved with the “action,” the brain is a great coordinator. It takes in sexual stimuli (like a provocative smile or a touch), processes them, and sends messages to the genitals to start getting ready, either through erection or vaginal lubrication.

Sex and Anxiety

Neuropathy a Common Cause of ED

An erection is a complex process. It may not seem that complicated – a man can be sexually turned on by his partner’s smile, an erotic fantasy, or a beautiful person who passes him on the street. An erection might even seem automatic.

What Happens During Orgasm?

Orgasm is a complex, mysterious process. But that hasn’t stopped scientists from trying to learn as much as they can. In fact, some volunteers have brought themselves to orgasm inside an MRI machine in the name of science.

A Man’s Penis Changes with Age

As we get older, it’s inevitable that our bodies change. Our hair might turn gray, our skin may become wrinkled, and we might put on a little weight. These are changes we can usually expect.

A Man’s Penis Changes with Age

Alcohol and Sex

Justin was the new guy at the office and he was looking forward to the company’s annual summer party, always held at the boss’s ritzy estate by the ocean. These parties were legendary, he’d been told. People from all over the region came to play volleyball on the beach, have bonfires after the sun went down. And it wasn’t uncommon for couples to wander off, claiming that what happens at the party stays at the party.

Alcohol and Sex

Drugs and Low Libido (Part 1)

When your sex drive plummets, it can be difficult to pinpoint why. Could it be low testosterone? Fluctuating hormones due to pregnancy or menopause? Fatigue or stress from a new job? Anxiety or depression? All of these factors can contribute to low libido. So can certain medical conditions like diabetes and cancer.

Drugs and Low Libido (Part 1)
Image